MAKING SPACE: The Social

During MAKING SPACE, The Social are facilitating: Gallery in a Gallery, The Social Street Residency, TinyMURL.Project, Nomad Thinking Residency, Open Studio 

Ōtautahi based collective The Social seek to create art experiences that are meaningful, relevant, collaborative and fun. Their operation is the epitome of low frills DIY. Their projects are typically wildly ambitious and bring together large groups of artists on a shoestring budget.

The Social is a community of artists who formed in Ōtautahi Christchurch in 2012, responding to the need for critical public dialogue and the lack of arts infrastructure at the time. Artist administrators Gaby Montejo, Lucy Matthews and Audrey Baldwin facilitate a much broader, non-hierarchical collective, which shifts and changes to fit opportunities as they present; the collective includes anywhere between three - forty artists, depending on who you ask.


The Social seeks to create art experiences that are meaningful, relevant, collaborative and fun. Their operation is the epitome of low frills DIY. Each of their projects typically brings together a group of artists on a shoestring budget, who work together to establish environments for art-based, social connections to occur.  


Key to their methodology is a democratic, accessible and transparent process. Following open calls for proposals, they try to ensure work remains relevant to a general public by enlisting non art-specialist panelists from a wide variety of backgrounds to assist with the selection process.


The Social encourages art to live and breathe outside of its usual infrastructure. Much of their work has taken place outside of galleries, and the group has become masterful in manipulating sites to fit their purpose, whether it is in a pop up exhibition in an untenanted shop, a performance on a vacant lot or a residency in a thrift store. They have been particularly prolific within the urban centre of post-quake Ōtautahi, where they have been responsible for many site specific, interactive performances and installations.

Since 2014, The Social has also been offering residencies, rotating through a series of public posters, and giving admin and consultation support to other city-wide projects such as First Thursdays Christchurch and Open Workshop.

 

Back to MAKING SPACE overview

The Artists

  • Adrienne Millwood
    Adrienne Millwood
    Christchurch

    Adrienne Millwood graduated BFA (1st class Hons) in painting from the University of Canterbury in 2012. She is also a qualified teacher with a degree in Anthropology. Focusing on ideas around time through the intersection between different mediums, mainly photography and painting, she also works with installation and interractive projects. Her work is often layered and uses found materials; time, memory and human traces are fundamental.

    Adrienne relocated to Wellington mid 2016, which saw her participating in her new project – Wellington Housesitting Art Residency. Living in 12 houses in 7 months provided the chance to further explore ideas of longing, and notions around presence and absence.

    Adrienne has exhibited in New Zealand, Australia and Japan, with her work held in private and public collections, including the University of Canterbury and James Wallace Trust Collection. This will be her 4th time engaging with The Social Collective in making and presenting new work. Adrienne is now based in Awakairangi (Lower Hutt).

     

    Web site
  • Aleshia Edens
    Aleshia Edens
    New Zealand
  • Alex Wootton
    Alex Wootton
    Christchurch
  • Andy Lukey
    Andy Lukey
    New Zealand

    Andy Lukey is a Christchurch based photographic artist who has documented the inner city over the last 7 years. "Mordor" is part of an ongoing series of his "City of Dust" works dealing with building deconstructions.

  • Audrey Baldwin
    Audrey Baldwin
    New Zealand

    Christchurch based artist Audrey Baldwin’s practice is predominantly performance based and centres around the body as a fraught space of constant contention. She investigates identity, power and control narratives, seeking to destabilise public/private, abject/erotic and subject/object binaries. Often utilising everyday actions and routines, Audrey seeks to reframe these actions in an absurd or ritualistic manner.

    Her work has been presented in galleries and as part of festivals around New Zealand as well as in Zimbabwe, Japan and India. 2016 saw her attend Morni Hills Performance Art Biennial in India alongside other performance artists from around the globe.

    Since 2010, Audrey has been performing and creating interventions and events in and around the Christchurch CBD, through her roles as both artist and arts event manager/co-ordinator for The Social artist collective and curator for First Thursdays Chch.

  • Brie Sherow
    Brie Sherow
    New Zealand
  • Callum Devlin
    Callum Devlin
    e-Whanganui-a-tara

    Callum Alexander Devlin is an artist based in Te-Whanganui-a-tara, Aotearoa. In 2015 Callum graduated with a BFA(Hons) from Massey University College of Creative Arts. In 2016 Callum founded MEANWHILE project space, with fellow Massey graduates Jesse Bowling and Jordana Bragg. Callum is currently interested in the anxiety surrounding nationalism within post-colonial countries. Also YouTube, flags and time travel. He works predominantly with found objects, film, social media and performance.

  • Carrot Boy
    Carrot Boy
    Christchurch

    I am inspired by found objects and urban decay. I attempt to bring out beauty from the unwanted and forgotten. With an interest in the weird and wonderful, I am currently exploring visual repetition with the use of the symbol of a carrot. I am endeavouring to lead a trail for my audience towards positive thinking using a ‘carrot and stick approach’. Life is about love and peace. Bomb Carrots, Not Countries.

  • Clara Wells
    Clara Wells
    Christchurch

    I am a motion artist recently returned to my hometown of Christchurch. I graduated with my Master of Fine Arts from the University of Canterbury in 2015 before moving to Hamilton, where I have been living for the last two years. My work is primarily concerned with motion; I am interested in experimental animation, sound art and the ways these can be used to depict motion (or abstractions of motion) in various forms.


    At the moment I am interested in uses of surrealist drawing techniques in animation as a way to document physical structures, such as pavements, and as a way to capture raw experiences, be they physical, psychological or abstract

    Website
  • Cushla Donaldson
    Cushla Donaldson
    Auckland

    Cushla Donaldson is an Elam School of Fine Arts graduate and gained an MFA from Goldsmiths College, London in 2007, supported by the Anne Reid scholarship from the University of Auckland. Donaldson is interested in the social, economic and historical functioning and narratives of contemporary markets, and the moments of absurd logic which, in fact, provide the potential for seemingly autonomous action. She has exhibited regularly in both New Zealand and Europe; recent solo exhibitions include Feminine Touches at Ferari Gallery, Auckland, 2012 and Cushla Donaldson & Fisher and Paykel present The Truth at 30upstairs Gallery, Wellington, 2013, Cushla Donaldson w/ Becks and guests- Supergroup/ with screening of Laure Provost’s film “The Wanderer (Betty Drunk)” 2014, the Headlands Sculpture in the Gulf 2015 (Premier Prize Awarded for sculpture "The Precariats") and her most recent solo exhibition "The Fairy Falls" curated by Ioana Gordon-Smith at Te Uru Gallery, Tāmaki Makaurau. She was also producer for Artbank bFM Radio Show 20015-16.

  • Dee Chisholm
    Dee Chisholm
    Christchurch

    Chisholm has a passion regarding Papatūānuku, how respect can look, feel, sound and taste, specifically under governmental policy.
    The clothing is constructed from one person's waste over a month, which attempts to capture "an act that is elegant and abject, seductive and antagonistic, assertive and subservient" (Reckitt, 2013, p. 134).

    Reckitt, Helena. 2013. Forgotten Relations: Feminist Artist's and Relational Aesthetics. Liverpool. Liverpool University Press

  • Erena Moses
    Erena Moses
    Christchurch


    Erena is the mother of two children, her art is her way of expressing her struggles with the family court and the corruption and alienation of the pakeha bureaucratic system. She thinks of herself more of an activist than an artist, but has found art to be an effective and positive way of communicating.

     

  • Gaby Montejo
    Gaby Montejo
    New Zealand

    Gaby Montejo approaches art through photo, music, interviews, and temporary installation often with performative actions.  Gaby’s work explores democracy and hierarchy in a way where the finished work is often consumed or destroyed during the process of making. Whilst exhibiting internationally, Gaby stays pivotal in the social initiatives and collaborative interventions of Christchurch and is a key member of the collective The Social. Born to Cuban parents, Gaby attended art school in Australia and America and moved to Christchurch in 2006.

    Exhibitions and works include The Pie Shop Surveillance Project for Open Workshop, XCHC, 2016;  National Contemporary Art Awards, Waikato Museum, Hamilton, 2015; Pay for the Printer, Triple Major, Shanghai, 2015; Milk Fight, 100 Peterborough Street, Christchurch, 2014; OPP, Chambers, Christchurch, 2013; Bring A Plate, Performance Arcade, Wellington, 2013; Goat in a Bikini, None Gallery, Dunedin, 2012;  The Art of Photography, San Diego Art Institute, California, 2012; New Zealand Sculpture OnShore, Auckland, 2012;  Shared Lines, Sendai Mediatheque, Japan, 2012;  Poltergeist, White Elephant Arts, Melbourne, 2011; and ...Nah It's Only Gaby, ABC, Christchurch, 2011.

     

  • Gemma Stratton
    Gemma Stratton
    Christchurch

    Gemma Stratton graduated from Ilam in 2007, majoring in sculpture. Her practice is a tangle of colours, encounters and endearing occasions. An important spanner in her works is long time collaborator Mirabel Oliver, a spinner of many creative plates.

  • Ivan Lupi
    Ivan Lupi
    Italy

    Ivan Lupi (born 1972, Ferrara, Italy). Masters in Queer Studies in Arts and Culture from the Birmingham University. Since 2001 Lupi has been an active member of the collective Amae with which he has taken part in various collaborations and exhibitions in China, Italy, France, Germany, Switzerland, Lithuania, United Kingdom. The most recent events: 'The Voice and the Lens' - Whitechapel Art Gallery (London 2014), 'The Slip of the tongue' - Palazzo Grassi Punta della Dogana (Venice 2015), 'Transformations' by LiVEART.US - Queens Museum (New York 2016), 'Experimenting with a wunderkammer of vanitas' - MACT/CACT Contemporary Art Ticino (Bellinzona 2016).

  • Jason Ware
    Jason Ware
    Christchurch

    My art practice is multidisciplinary; I create sculpture and collages but also photography, sound and short films. I used to be apolitical but the recent goings on in the world have been changing my focus somewhat. My work is inspired by natural and man-made phenomena, as well as metaphysical concerns. My curiosity lies within the form-function, function-form question. How can an object display its purpose, if we don’t recognise it, can I create new objects that impart a meaning? I am also looking at the boundaries of perception and interpretation. When do we see an object and when do we comprehend it? Do we need to understand in the conventional sense? Where does the meaning lie? I am fascinated by the idea of an object that can express practical and conceptual function, through its visual and tactile features – be they mechanical or otherwise. My drive is to develop these inchoate problems. Often emerging as clear images in my subconscious, my work exhibits surreal beginnings; immanent thoughts with the potential to cause effects outside the mind. Ideas appear as abstract thoughts from various starting points, and then evolve through drawings, collages, maquettes and material trials. Through rational and intuitive reckoning, I construct prototypes – much like an engineer – in response to my experiences and corresponding ideas.

    My material choices are an instinctive and playful process, made with consideration of their suitability for the concept but they also aid in decision making whilst constructing. I use various conventional materials such as wood, metal, paper, found objects but have also used soil and plant fibre. I prefer to use ecologically sound methods and I recycle materials where possible, these materials are rejuvenated and can provide temporal qualities such as patinas. My practice is process based; I prefer traces of its evolution to be a part of the texture. I think of sculpture as comprising of an interdependent relationship between interior and exterior structures. I engage with the materials of the two structures, exploring the interaction between them and the spaces they delineate. My works are propositions suggesting possibilities; this is particularly evident in my collages. My aim is to present perplexing art works, with which the viewer can then experience an engagement. I succeed when I convey a sense of a process and purpose through work in a provocative manner.

    Originally trained as an engineering surveyor, I am a recent graduate of the University Of Canterbury School Of Fine Arts majoring in sculpture. I also practice other art forms such as collage, photography, film and sound. My work has appeared in a number of solo and group shows in Christchurch and abroad.

     

  • Jordana Bragg
    Jordana Bragg
    Wellington

    Jordana Bragg is a contemporary multidisciplinary artist based in Wellington, Aotearoa. Their writing, curation, performance based video and photographic observations have reached national acclaim, as well as international success in both Europe and Australia. Bragg is co-founder of two Artist Run Initiatives; MEANWHILE (Wellington, NZ) and Friends are Artists / Freunde sind Künstler (Leipzig, Germany); working continuously to progress contemporary notions of inclusion fluidity, identity and gender performativity.

    Web site
  • Julia Harvie
    Julia Harvie
    New Zealand

    Julia graduated from UNITEC in 2003 with a BPSA in Contemporary Dance. Julia’s particular focus is on collaboration, live music and improvisation. She was awarded the Tup Lang Scholarship as the CNZ Emerging Choreographer of 2008. Her work has toured throughout New Zealand and has been presented in Taiwan and Australia. Julia studied with Magpie Music Dance in Amsterdam and was selected for the WDA Choreographer Project in Brisbane with Lloyd Newsom (DV8). She has been awarded Most Outstanding Performer of the NZ Fringe, Best Dance at the Dunedin Fringe and NZ Best Female Contemporary Dancer in 2008. Julia has worked for acclaimed artists such as, Michael Parmenter, Shona McCullagh, Kristian Larsen, Zoe Scofield, Riki von Falken, Pichet, Raewyn Hill, Malia Johnston, Oliver Driver, Andrew and Sarah Foster-Sproull, Emma Willis and Leila Adu.

  • Julia Holden
    Julia Holden
    Christchurch

    Julia Holden is an independent artist currently based in Christchurch, New Zealand. Julia as always experimented with modes of representation and developing new audiences for the visual arts, her attention is now keenly focused on encouraging public interaction through innovative relational practices. She has developed strategies for personal and collaborative painting centered upon outcomes that encompass new possibilities for audience participation in artistic processes that encourage connections within communities, well being and wider social engagement.

    Following a successful film and television career, Julia Holden gained BFA from Elam, School of Fine Arts (NZ) 2007 and MFA by Research at Monash University, Melbourne (AU) 2011. During her

    time in Australia, Holden was a finalist in the national emerging-artist prize The Churchie 2011, exhibited in SafARI 2012, and was a finalist in The Doug Moran National Portrait Prize 2011 & 2012. Since moving to post-earthquake Christchurch in 2012, Holden has directly engaged with rebuild projects and was guest Lecturer at Ilam School of Fine Arts.

  • Leafa Wilson
    Song to the sun - Morni Hills, Performance Art Biennale, Haryana Hills, North India, 2016
    Song to the sun - Morni Hills, Performance Art Biennale, Haryana Hills, North India, 2016
    Leafa Wilson
    New Zealand

    Leafa Wilson is an accomplished artist, curator and writer based in Waikato, New Zealand. Her commitment to the arts spans twenty-eight years where she has become a pioneer for curatorial practices. In 2004, Wilson was appointed the role of Curator of Art at Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato, making her the first person of Pacific descent to hold an institutional role as an art curator. Since then, Wilson has diversified the museum collection and developed exhibitions with leading New Zealand and International artists including Suji Park: Not Very So 2013; the exhibition series Letters to the Ancestors: Contemporary Indigenous Art from Aotearoa and the Pacific 2005; and Dolly Mix (W) Rapper 2002.

    As an artist, Wilson is revered for her experimental performances and multi-media installations. She has often worked under the nom de guerre Leafa Wilson a.k.a Olga Krause, a name that queries the boundaries of indigenous and Western ideologies and re-colonising her own name with her black body . Her diverse interests have resulted in unique collaborations and projects such as the art zine Pre/Post Rapture; the performance work Anthro. 101 with Dr. Nichola Harcourt and Faith Wilson; Hedwig and George (with Georgina Watson) and ongoing collaboration with her daughter, writer and poet, Faith Saufo’i Wilson. Her musical interests are a blend of performance art and music with her art band Bushwig as well as  musical projects with Alex Mustard (of Lookie Loos) band,The Jansens and playing tenor horn for the Monster Orkestra under bohemian composer and conductor, Justine Francis. Leafa Wilson a.k.a Olga Krause has exhibited widely in solo and group exhibitions and held artist residencies at the University of Queensland Brisbane in 2006 and the Burke Museum, Washington D.C. in 2005.

     

     

    Text By Ane Tonga, 2015

    Image: Te Manawa  

    Leafa Wilson
  • Liv Worsnop
    Liv Worsnop
    New Zealand

    Liv Worsnop graduated from Ilam School of Fine Arts with a BFA in 2012, majoring in Sculpture and she has thus pursued a cross disciplinary practice. Through the moving, shifting and manipulation of found detritus Liv investigates the way we as energetic beings exist within the physical world. This work has culminated in various exhibitions including The Periphery State held at the Physics Room in 2014.

    Another thread of her practice has operated under the title Plant Gang and has looked to natures reaction within the post quake Christchurch landscape. Projects have included a catalogue of wild plants growing in the central city, a zen garden constructed of materials found on site and various guerrilla gardens. Through the invitation to the general public to be involved, this ongoing project has traversed environmental and social based relationships and reactions to postquake Christchurch.

    Liv Worsnop
  • Lucy Matthews
    Lucy Matthews
    Christchurch

    Lucy's practice almost always involves other humans. with an aim to provide new experiences that foster connection, a new perspective and some introspection about human relations. Sometimes they are light and simple gestures and sometimes more pointed and political but all consider and take to heart the human condition. Lucy Matthews is a Department of Art Relations and Therapy clinician, a graduate of Ilam school of fine arts, a mum, a psychotherapists and someone who is generally intrigued by the human experience.Lucy will be working in the studio space.

  • Mandy Joass
    Mandy Joass
    Christchurch

    Whangarei born Christchurch based artist Mandy Cherry Joass graduated from the University of Canterbury with a BFA in sculpture in 2015. Her full time art practice also includes painting, printing, and illustration.

    She is using raranga (weaving) as a metaphor to explore themes relating to postcolonial identity The oppositional direction of warp and weft combine individual strands to create a fabric, larger and stronger than the separate elements.

    Following in the footsteps of her Kuia, Cherry Joass and great Kuia Cecily Ruby Mcmanus, Joass seeks to preserve and perpetuate all things Matarangi Māori in an inclusive and lighthearted way.

  • Mark Catley
    Mark Catley
    Christchurch
  • Mark Harvey
    Mark Harvey
    New Zealand

    Mark Harvey is an Aotearoa/New Zealand-based artist mostly working in performance and video drawing on political, psychological and social approaches and physical endurance. He brings to his practice a focus on social justice often and notions of productive idiocy and has training in contemporary dance, visual arts, psychology and community facilitation.

    Some of the galleries related events he has presented in, include: The 55thVenice Biennale for Visual Arts (2013), the New Zealand Festival of the Arts (2012), Umeå Art Museum, (Sweden, 2016), the Trendheim Kunstmuseum (2012), the New Performance Turku Festival (Finland, 2014 and 2016), Te Uru gallery (Auckland, 2016), Laznia Contemporary Art centre (Gdansk, Poland, 2015), Prague Quadrennial (201 5), Hitparaden (Copenhagen, 2014), Te Tuhi Gallery (Auckland, 2012, 2014 and 2016), Window (Auckland, 2008), the Govett Brewster Art Gallery (Taranaki, NZ, 2006), Gallery ZET (Amsterdam, 2011), Blue Oyster (Dunedin, 2009), Auckland Festival of the Arts (2005 and 2015), Physicsroom Contemporary Artspace (Christchurch, 2002 and 2006), City Gallery  (Wellington, 2005),  Canary (Auckland, 2005) and Enjoy Gallery (Wellington, 2003). His writing has also been published in a range of publications such as the UK Performance Research Journal (2006 and 2013) and the South Project (2013). Harvey is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Creative Arts and Industries at The University of Auckland and has a PhD from AUT University related practice. He has recently published a book on a sample of 14 years of his practice titled Play Book (Index Design and Publishing).

     

  • Matt Joils
    Matt Joils
    Christchurch

    Originally from Kirikiriroa, Matthew Joils is a multidisciplinary artist based in Otautahi. Graduating from Ilam in 2016 with a major in film making, his work includes installation incorporating poetry and new media, as well as forays into painting, pottery, and gardening as art practice.

    Matt is drawn to the natural world with a sense of wonder. He believes that many pertinent questions of the future find answers in learning from the natural world. Drawing inspiration from such diverse areas as human geography, life sciences, architecture, poetry, and his own lived experience, Matt seeks to spark meaningful culture change. Abstracted activism.

    Co-curator of Student Series 2016- Ilam Campus Gallery
    Waiting- The Casting Room
    Student series 2014

  • Matt Ward
    Matt Ward
    New Zealand
  • Mirabel Oliver
    Mirabel Oliver
    Christchurch
  • Numangatini Mackenzie
    Numangatini Mackenzie
    Tāmaki Makaurau

    Interdisciplinary artist Numangatini Mackenzie works in graf, tatau and mixed media installation. His practice centres on the exploration of urban space and the processes of building connections to his Pacific heritage and people. His research engages with literature on Oceanic art, museum collections as well as collaborations with living practitioners of art forms ranging from tatau, painting and spoken word to voyaging/navigation and street art. Numa often responds to these experiences and sites of investigation through large public graf installations, performance and printmaking. He is actively involved in cultural heritage projects, performative acti.VA.tions, research and community development in New Zealand, where he is now based, and the Cook Islands.

    Numa was born in Canada where his hunger to understand his culture grew, which prompted him to move the Cook Islands in 2009. His move gave Numa the opportunity to grow family ties and his understanding of cultural arts like tapa, tatau and voyaging.

    In 2011 Numa was honoured to participate in the Pacific Voyagers “Te Mana O Te Moana“ Voyage, sailing throughout the Pacific on Marumaru Atua – the Cook Island double hulled vaka/canoe that accompanied six other canoes from across the Pacific. The mission of the expedition was to use the wisdom of the ancestors, combined with modern science, to propel the Pacific into a more sustainable future. Recognizing the pacific ocean as a living entity in need of protection and to re-awaken the next generation with cultural values through the traditions of voyaging.

    The voyage took him across the pacific to the Solomon Islands to participate in the 11th Festival of Pacific Arts. The experience exponentially grew his Polynesian family, cementing his belief of the unmatched connections between Pacific peoples and allowed him to share his artwork throughout the Pacific.

    This voyage, like many since then, has given Numa the knowledge to stand in the worlds largest Polynesian city with community, has exhibited work in Canada, The Cook Islands New Zealand and Australia.
    He now resides in Auckland New Zealand

  • Olivia Isabel-Smith
    Olivia Isabel-Smith
    Christchurch

    Olivia has completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the University of Canterbury, majoring in Painting. She resides in Lyttelton, living and working on my art practice in a garage space. Most of her interest is in still life painting, sculpture and exploring objects in relation to the body and the environment.

    She uses forms drawn from the natural and man-made worlds as sources of inspiration. The natural elements include fleshy tones, found objects and sculptural moulds, while a man-made and spiritual contrast is suggested in the use of white or blank space. Still life is treated as a point of departure, toward a variety of works that incorporate photo release methods, water colours and linear elements, realised within a limited colour palette.

  • Robert Baker
    Robert Baker
    New Zealand
  • Rubee Prattley-Jones
    Rubee Prattley-Jones
    Christchurch

    Rubee Prattley-Jones resides in Christchurch and has recently completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts at The University of Canterbury. Whether it’s the studio, gallery or the natural world, Rubees practice responds to her immediate surroundings. Drawing attention to the mundane, she pays tribute to accumulations and traces that collect all around us. Her site specific practice stems from a great sense of wonder and appreciation for the earth. Making use of a variety of media, her sculptural and installation work include found and hand-made objects. Rubee has exhibited at CORNER Gallery in Auckland (2016) and during her time at University exhibited in various solo and group shows, including the Student Series at SOFA Gallery (2016).

    Blog
  • Sandrine Castel
    Sandrine Castel
    Christchurch
  • Scrap Princess
    Scrap Princess
    New Zealand

    I make things out of things. Break and mutate into sorcery fetish, but a blind one , absent of mythology . Animals out of trash. Music out of noise. I've also made instruments, masks, full body stilt costumes, rotating sets. For myself , for audiences, for unintended audiences, for passers-by and attendees. In Public Space, Private Space, and Secret Space.
    Fungal building process: both an eating , an attack on environment , and recycling/theft.

    Christchurch, Wellington, Dunedin , Melbourne , Dunedin , Wellington, Christchurch again.

    I move a lot.

    Web site
  • Tao Wells
    Tao Wells
    Te Waipounamu

    ao Wells, figure head of Wells Group PPR, promotes; "everything is art and everyone is an artist. The question being, therefore, ‘what is it the art of? Capitalism". In 2017 Wells joined a Civil Union Co-op with Laura Wells and is currently based in Te Waipounamu.

  • The Social
    The Social
    Christchurch

    The Social is a community of artists who formed in Ōtautahi Christchurch in 2012, responding to the need for critical public dialogue and the lack of arts infrastructure at the time. Artist administrators Gaby Montejo, Lucy Matthews and Audrey Baldwin facilitate a much broader, non-hierarchical collective, which shifts and changes to fit opportunities as they present; the collective includes anywhere between three - forty artists, depending on who you ask.

  • Tony Scanlan
    Tony Scanlan
    Christchurch

    Tony has been drawing and painting for a number of years, He studied print making as a mature student at Canterbury University and has recently completed a degree in Psychology.

Adrienne Millwood
Christchurch

Adrienne Millwood graduated BFA (1st class Hons) in painting from the University of Canterbury in 2012. She is also a qualified teacher with a degree in Anthropology. Focusing on ideas around time through the intersection between different mediums, mainly photography and painting, she also works with installation and interractive projects. Her work is often layered and uses found materials; time, memory and human traces are fundamental.

Adrienne relocated to Wellington mid 2016, which saw her participating in her new project – Wellington Housesitting Art Residency. Living in 12 houses in 7 months provided the chance to further explore ideas of longing, and notions around presence and absence.

Adrienne has exhibited in New Zealand, Australia and Japan, with her work held in private and public collections, including the University of Canterbury and James Wallace Trust Collection. This will be her 4th time engaging with The Social Collective in making and presenting new work. Adrienne is now based in Awakairangi (Lower Hutt).

 

View artwork
Aleshia Edens
New Zealand
View artwork
Alex Wootton
Christchurch
View artwork
Andy Lukey
New Zealand

Andy Lukey is a Christchurch based photographic artist who has documented the inner city over the last 7 years. "Mordor" is part of an ongoing series of his "City of Dust" works dealing with building deconstructions.

View artwork
Audrey Baldwin
New Zealand

Christchurch based artist Audrey Baldwin’s practice is predominantly performance based and centres around the body as a fraught space of constant contention. She investigates identity, power and control narratives, seeking to destabilise public/private, abject/erotic and subject/object binaries. Often utilising everyday actions and routines, Audrey seeks to reframe these actions in an absurd or ritualistic manner.

Her work has been presented in galleries and as part of festivals around New Zealand as well as in Zimbabwe, Japan and India. 2016 saw her attend Morni Hills Performance Art Biennial in India alongside other performance artists from around the globe.

Since 2010, Audrey has been performing and creating interventions and events in and around the Christchurch CBD, through her roles as both artist and arts event manager/co-ordinator for The Social artist collective and curator for First Thursdays Chch.

Brie Sherow
New Zealand
View artwork
Callum Devlin
e-Whanganui-a-tara

Callum Alexander Devlin is an artist based in Te-Whanganui-a-tara, Aotearoa. In 2015 Callum graduated with a BFA(Hons) from Massey University College of Creative Arts. In 2016 Callum founded MEANWHILE project space, with fellow Massey graduates Jesse Bowling and Jordana Bragg. Callum is currently interested in the anxiety surrounding nationalism within post-colonial countries. Also YouTube, flags and time travel. He works predominantly with found objects, film, social media and performance.

View artwork
Carrot Boy
Christchurch

I am inspired by found objects and urban decay. I attempt to bring out beauty from the unwanted and forgotten. With an interest in the weird and wonderful, I am currently exploring visual repetition with the use of the symbol of a carrot. I am endeavouring to lead a trail for my audience towards positive thinking using a ‘carrot and stick approach’. Life is about love and peace. Bomb Carrots, Not Countries.

View artwork
Clara Wells
Christchurch

I am a motion artist recently returned to my hometown of Christchurch. I graduated with my Master of Fine Arts from the University of Canterbury in 2015 before moving to Hamilton, where I have been living for the last two years. My work is primarily concerned with motion; I am interested in experimental animation, sound art and the ways these can be used to depict motion (or abstractions of motion) in various forms.


At the moment I am interested in uses of surrealist drawing techniques in animation as a way to document physical structures, such as pavements, and as a way to capture raw experiences, be they physical, psychological or abstract

View artwork
Cushla Donaldson
Auckland

Cushla Donaldson is an Elam School of Fine Arts graduate and gained an MFA from Goldsmiths College, London in 2007, supported by the Anne Reid scholarship from the University of Auckland. Donaldson is interested in the social, economic and historical functioning and narratives of contemporary markets, and the moments of absurd logic which, in fact, provide the potential for seemingly autonomous action. She has exhibited regularly in both New Zealand and Europe; recent solo exhibitions include Feminine Touches at Ferari Gallery, Auckland, 2012 and Cushla Donaldson & Fisher and Paykel present The Truth at 30upstairs Gallery, Wellington, 2013, Cushla Donaldson w/ Becks and guests- Supergroup/ with screening of Laure Provost’s film “The Wanderer (Betty Drunk)” 2014, the Headlands Sculpture in the Gulf 2015 (Premier Prize Awarded for sculpture "The Precariats") and her most recent solo exhibition "The Fairy Falls" curated by Ioana Gordon-Smith at Te Uru Gallery, Tāmaki Makaurau. She was also producer for Artbank bFM Radio Show 20015-16.

View artwork
Dee Chisholm
Christchurch

Chisholm has a passion regarding Papatūānuku, how respect can look, feel, sound and taste, specifically under governmental policy.
The clothing is constructed from one person's waste over a month, which attempts to capture "an act that is elegant and abject, seductive and antagonistic, assertive and subservient" (Reckitt, 2013, p. 134).

Reckitt, Helena. 2013. Forgotten Relations: Feminist Artist's and Relational Aesthetics. Liverpool. Liverpool University Press

View artwork
Erena Moses
Christchurch


Erena is the mother of two children, her art is her way of expressing her struggles with the family court and the corruption and alienation of the pakeha bureaucratic system. She thinks of herself more of an activist than an artist, but has found art to be an effective and positive way of communicating.

 

View artwork
Gaby Montejo
New Zealand

Gaby Montejo approaches art through photo, music, interviews, and temporary installation often with performative actions.  Gaby’s work explores democracy and hierarchy in a way where the finished work is often consumed or destroyed during the process of making. Whilst exhibiting internationally, Gaby stays pivotal in the social initiatives and collaborative interventions of Christchurch and is a key member of the collective The Social. Born to Cuban parents, Gaby attended art school in Australia and America and moved to Christchurch in 2006.

Exhibitions and works include The Pie Shop Surveillance Project for Open Workshop, XCHC, 2016;  National Contemporary Art Awards, Waikato Museum, Hamilton, 2015; Pay for the Printer, Triple Major, Shanghai, 2015; Milk Fight, 100 Peterborough Street, Christchurch, 2014; OPP, Chambers, Christchurch, 2013; Bring A Plate, Performance Arcade, Wellington, 2013; Goat in a Bikini, None Gallery, Dunedin, 2012;  The Art of Photography, San Diego Art Institute, California, 2012; New Zealand Sculpture OnShore, Auckland, 2012;  Shared Lines, Sendai Mediatheque, Japan, 2012;  Poltergeist, White Elephant Arts, Melbourne, 2011; and ...Nah It's Only Gaby, ABC, Christchurch, 2011.

 

Gemma Stratton
Christchurch

Gemma Stratton graduated from Ilam in 2007, majoring in sculpture. Her practice is a tangle of colours, encounters and endearing occasions. An important spanner in her works is long time collaborator Mirabel Oliver, a spinner of many creative plates.

View artwork
Ivan Lupi
Italy

Ivan Lupi (born 1972, Ferrara, Italy). Masters in Queer Studies in Arts and Culture from the Birmingham University. Since 2001 Lupi has been an active member of the collective Amae with which he has taken part in various collaborations and exhibitions in China, Italy, France, Germany, Switzerland, Lithuania, United Kingdom. The most recent events: 'The Voice and the Lens' - Whitechapel Art Gallery (London 2014), 'The Slip of the tongue' - Palazzo Grassi Punta della Dogana (Venice 2015), 'Transformations' by LiVEART.US - Queens Museum (New York 2016), 'Experimenting with a wunderkammer of vanitas' - MACT/CACT Contemporary Art Ticino (Bellinzona 2016).

View artwork
Jason Ware
Christchurch

My art practice is multidisciplinary; I create sculpture and collages but also photography, sound and short films. I used to be apolitical but the recent goings on in the world have been changing my focus somewhat. My work is inspired by natural and man-made phenomena, as well as metaphysical concerns. My curiosity lies within the form-function, function-form question. How can an object display its purpose, if we don’t recognise it, can I create new objects that impart a meaning? I am also looking at the boundaries of perception and interpretation. When do we see an object and when do we comprehend it? Do we need to understand in the conventional sense? Where does the meaning lie? I am fascinated by the idea of an object that can express practical and conceptual function, through its visual and tactile features – be they mechanical or otherwise. My drive is to develop these inchoate problems. Often emerging as clear images in my subconscious, my work exhibits surreal beginnings; immanent thoughts with the potential to cause effects outside the mind. Ideas appear as abstract thoughts from various starting points, and then evolve through drawings, collages, maquettes and material trials. Through rational and intuitive reckoning, I construct prototypes – much like an engineer – in response to my experiences and corresponding ideas.

My material choices are an instinctive and playful process, made with consideration of their suitability for the concept but they also aid in decision making whilst constructing. I use various conventional materials such as wood, metal, paper, found objects but have also used soil and plant fibre. I prefer to use ecologically sound methods and I recycle materials where possible, these materials are rejuvenated and can provide temporal qualities such as patinas. My practice is process based; I prefer traces of its evolution to be a part of the texture. I think of sculpture as comprising of an interdependent relationship between interior and exterior structures. I engage with the materials of the two structures, exploring the interaction between them and the spaces they delineate. My works are propositions suggesting possibilities; this is particularly evident in my collages. My aim is to present perplexing art works, with which the viewer can then experience an engagement. I succeed when I convey a sense of a process and purpose through work in a provocative manner.

Originally trained as an engineering surveyor, I am a recent graduate of the University Of Canterbury School Of Fine Arts majoring in sculpture. I also practice other art forms such as collage, photography, film and sound. My work has appeared in a number of solo and group shows in Christchurch and abroad.

 

View artwork
Jordana Bragg
Wellington

Jordana Bragg is a contemporary multidisciplinary artist based in Wellington, Aotearoa. Their writing, curation, performance based video and photographic observations have reached national acclaim, as well as international success in both Europe and Australia. Bragg is co-founder of two Artist Run Initiatives; MEANWHILE (Wellington, NZ) and Friends are Artists / Freunde sind Künstler (Leipzig, Germany); working continuously to progress contemporary notions of inclusion fluidity, identity and gender performativity.

View artwork
Julia Harvie
New Zealand

Julia graduated from UNITEC in 2003 with a BPSA in Contemporary Dance. Julia’s particular focus is on collaboration, live music and improvisation. She was awarded the Tup Lang Scholarship as the CNZ Emerging Choreographer of 2008. Her work has toured throughout New Zealand and has been presented in Taiwan and Australia. Julia studied with Magpie Music Dance in Amsterdam and was selected for the WDA Choreographer Project in Brisbane with Lloyd Newsom (DV8). She has been awarded Most Outstanding Performer of the NZ Fringe, Best Dance at the Dunedin Fringe and NZ Best Female Contemporary Dancer in 2008. Julia has worked for acclaimed artists such as, Michael Parmenter, Shona McCullagh, Kristian Larsen, Zoe Scofield, Riki von Falken, Pichet, Raewyn Hill, Malia Johnston, Oliver Driver, Andrew and Sarah Foster-Sproull, Emma Willis and Leila Adu.

View artwork
Julia Holden
Christchurch

Julia Holden is an independent artist currently based in Christchurch, New Zealand. Julia as always experimented with modes of representation and developing new audiences for the visual arts, her attention is now keenly focused on encouraging public interaction through innovative relational practices. She has developed strategies for personal and collaborative painting centered upon outcomes that encompass new possibilities for audience participation in artistic processes that encourage connections within communities, well being and wider social engagement.

Following a successful film and television career, Julia Holden gained BFA from Elam, School of Fine Arts (NZ) 2007 and MFA by Research at Monash University, Melbourne (AU) 2011. During her

time in Australia, Holden was a finalist in the national emerging-artist prize The Churchie 2011, exhibited in SafARI 2012, and was a finalist in The Doug Moran National Portrait Prize 2011 & 2012. Since moving to post-earthquake Christchurch in 2012, Holden has directly engaged with rebuild projects and was guest Lecturer at Ilam School of Fine Arts.

View artwork
Song to the sun - Morni Hills, Performance Art Biennale, Haryana Hills, North India, 2016
Song to the sun - Morni Hills, Performance Art Biennale, Haryana Hills, North India, 2016
Leafa Wilson
New Zealand

Leafa Wilson is an accomplished artist, curator and writer based in Waikato, New Zealand. Her commitment to the arts spans twenty-eight years where she has become a pioneer for curatorial practices. In 2004, Wilson was appointed the role of Curator of Art at Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato, making her the first person of Pacific descent to hold an institutional role as an art curator. Since then, Wilson has diversified the museum collection and developed exhibitions with leading New Zealand and International artists including Suji Park: Not Very So 2013; the exhibition series Letters to the Ancestors: Contemporary Indigenous Art from Aotearoa and the Pacific 2005; and Dolly Mix (W) Rapper 2002.

As an artist, Wilson is revered for her experimental performances and multi-media installations. She has often worked under the nom de guerre Leafa Wilson a.k.a Olga Krause, a name that queries the boundaries of indigenous and Western ideologies and re-colonising her own name with her black body . Her diverse interests have resulted in unique collaborations and projects such as the art zine Pre/Post Rapture; the performance work Anthro. 101 with Dr. Nichola Harcourt and Faith Wilson; Hedwig and George (with Georgina Watson) and ongoing collaboration with her daughter, writer and poet, Faith Saufo’i Wilson. Her musical interests are a blend of performance art and music with her art band Bushwig as well as  musical projects with Alex Mustard (of Lookie Loos) band,The Jansens and playing tenor horn for the Monster Orkestra under bohemian composer and conductor, Justine Francis. Leafa Wilson a.k.a Olga Krause has exhibited widely in solo and group exhibitions and held artist residencies at the University of Queensland Brisbane in 2006 and the Burke Museum, Washington D.C. in 2005.

 

 

Text By Ane Tonga, 2015

Image: Te Manawa  

View artwork
Liv Worsnop
New Zealand

Liv Worsnop graduated from Ilam School of Fine Arts with a BFA in 2012, majoring in Sculpture and she has thus pursued a cross disciplinary practice. Through the moving, shifting and manipulation of found detritus Liv investigates the way we as energetic beings exist within the physical world. This work has culminated in various exhibitions including The Periphery State held at the Physics Room in 2014.

Another thread of her practice has operated under the title Plant Gang and has looked to natures reaction within the post quake Christchurch landscape. Projects have included a catalogue of wild plants growing in the central city, a zen garden constructed of materials found on site and various guerrilla gardens. Through the invitation to the general public to be involved, this ongoing project has traversed environmental and social based relationships and reactions to postquake Christchurch.

View artwork
Lucy Matthews
Christchurch

Lucy's practice almost always involves other humans. with an aim to provide new experiences that foster connection, a new perspective and some introspection about human relations. Sometimes they are light and simple gestures and sometimes more pointed and political but all consider and take to heart the human condition. Lucy Matthews is a Department of Art Relations and Therapy clinician, a graduate of Ilam school of fine arts, a mum, a psychotherapists and someone who is generally intrigued by the human experience.Lucy will be working in the studio space.

View artwork
Mandy Joass
Christchurch

Whangarei born Christchurch based artist Mandy Cherry Joass graduated from the University of Canterbury with a BFA in sculpture in 2015. Her full time art practice also includes painting, printing, and illustration.

She is using raranga (weaving) as a metaphor to explore themes relating to postcolonial identity The oppositional direction of warp and weft combine individual strands to create a fabric, larger and stronger than the separate elements.

Following in the footsteps of her Kuia, Cherry Joass and great Kuia Cecily Ruby Mcmanus, Joass seeks to preserve and perpetuate all things Matarangi Māori in an inclusive and lighthearted way.

View artwork
Mark Catley
Christchurch
View artwork
Mark Harvey
New Zealand

Mark Harvey is an Aotearoa/New Zealand-based artist mostly working in performance and video drawing on political, psychological and social approaches and physical endurance. He brings to his practice a focus on social justice often and notions of productive idiocy and has training in contemporary dance, visual arts, psychology and community facilitation.

Some of the galleries related events he has presented in, include: The 55thVenice Biennale for Visual Arts (2013), the New Zealand Festival of the Arts (2012), Umeå Art Museum, (Sweden, 2016), the Trendheim Kunstmuseum (2012), the New Performance Turku Festival (Finland, 2014 and 2016), Te Uru gallery (Auckland, 2016), Laznia Contemporary Art centre (Gdansk, Poland, 2015), Prague Quadrennial (201 5), Hitparaden (Copenhagen, 2014), Te Tuhi Gallery (Auckland, 2012, 2014 and 2016), Window (Auckland, 2008), the Govett Brewster Art Gallery (Taranaki, NZ, 2006), Gallery ZET (Amsterdam, 2011), Blue Oyster (Dunedin, 2009), Auckland Festival of the Arts (2005 and 2015), Physicsroom Contemporary Artspace (Christchurch, 2002 and 2006), City Gallery  (Wellington, 2005),  Canary (Auckland, 2005) and Enjoy Gallery (Wellington, 2003). His writing has also been published in a range of publications such as the UK Performance Research Journal (2006 and 2013) and the South Project (2013). Harvey is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Creative Arts and Industries at The University of Auckland and has a PhD from AUT University related practice. He has recently published a book on a sample of 14 years of his practice titled Play Book (Index Design and Publishing).

 

View artwork
Matt Joils
Christchurch

Originally from Kirikiriroa, Matthew Joils is a multidisciplinary artist based in Otautahi. Graduating from Ilam in 2016 with a major in film making, his work includes installation incorporating poetry and new media, as well as forays into painting, pottery, and gardening as art practice.

Matt is drawn to the natural world with a sense of wonder. He believes that many pertinent questions of the future find answers in learning from the natural world. Drawing inspiration from such diverse areas as human geography, life sciences, architecture, poetry, and his own lived experience, Matt seeks to spark meaningful culture change. Abstracted activism.

Co-curator of Student Series 2016- Ilam Campus Gallery
Waiting- The Casting Room
Student series 2014

View artwork
Matt Ward
New Zealand
View artwork
Mirabel Oliver
Christchurch
View artwork
Numangatini Mackenzie
Tāmaki Makaurau

Interdisciplinary artist Numangatini Mackenzie works in graf, tatau and mixed media installation. His practice centres on the exploration of urban space and the processes of building connections to his Pacific heritage and people. His research engages with literature on Oceanic art, museum collections as well as collaborations with living practitioners of art forms ranging from tatau, painting and spoken word to voyaging/navigation and street art. Numa often responds to these experiences and sites of investigation through large public graf installations, performance and printmaking. He is actively involved in cultural heritage projects, performative acti.VA.tions, research and community development in New Zealand, where he is now based, and the Cook Islands.

Numa was born in Canada where his hunger to understand his culture grew, which prompted him to move the Cook Islands in 2009. His move gave Numa the opportunity to grow family ties and his understanding of cultural arts like tapa, tatau and voyaging.

In 2011 Numa was honoured to participate in the Pacific Voyagers “Te Mana O Te Moana“ Voyage, sailing throughout the Pacific on Marumaru Atua – the Cook Island double hulled vaka/canoe that accompanied six other canoes from across the Pacific. The mission of the expedition was to use the wisdom of the ancestors, combined with modern science, to propel the Pacific into a more sustainable future. Recognizing the pacific ocean as a living entity in need of protection and to re-awaken the next generation with cultural values through the traditions of voyaging.

The voyage took him across the pacific to the Solomon Islands to participate in the 11th Festival of Pacific Arts. The experience exponentially grew his Polynesian family, cementing his belief of the unmatched connections between Pacific peoples and allowed him to share his artwork throughout the Pacific.

This voyage, like many since then, has given Numa the knowledge to stand in the worlds largest Polynesian city with community, has exhibited work in Canada, The Cook Islands New Zealand and Australia.
He now resides in Auckland New Zealand

View artwork
Olivia Isabel-Smith
Christchurch

Olivia has completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the University of Canterbury, majoring in Painting. She resides in Lyttelton, living and working on my art practice in a garage space. Most of her interest is in still life painting, sculpture and exploring objects in relation to the body and the environment.

She uses forms drawn from the natural and man-made worlds as sources of inspiration. The natural elements include fleshy tones, found objects and sculptural moulds, while a man-made and spiritual contrast is suggested in the use of white or blank space. Still life is treated as a point of departure, toward a variety of works that incorporate photo release methods, water colours and linear elements, realised within a limited colour palette.

View artwork
Robert Baker
New Zealand
View artwork
Rubee Prattley-Jones
Christchurch

Rubee Prattley-Jones resides in Christchurch and has recently completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts at The University of Canterbury. Whether it’s the studio, gallery or the natural world, Rubees practice responds to her immediate surroundings. Drawing attention to the mundane, she pays tribute to accumulations and traces that collect all around us. Her site specific practice stems from a great sense of wonder and appreciation for the earth. Making use of a variety of media, her sculptural and installation work include found and hand-made objects. Rubee has exhibited at CORNER Gallery in Auckland (2016) and during her time at University exhibited in various solo and group shows, including the Student Series at SOFA Gallery (2016).

View artwork
Sandrine Castel
Christchurch
View artwork
Scrap Princess
New Zealand

I make things out of things. Break and mutate into sorcery fetish, but a blind one , absent of mythology . Animals out of trash. Music out of noise. I've also made instruments, masks, full body stilt costumes, rotating sets. For myself , for audiences, for unintended audiences, for passers-by and attendees. In Public Space, Private Space, and Secret Space.
Fungal building process: both an eating , an attack on environment , and recycling/theft.

Christchurch, Wellington, Dunedin , Melbourne , Dunedin , Wellington, Christchurch again.

I move a lot.

View artwork
Tao Wells
Te Waipounamu

ao Wells, figure head of Wells Group PPR, promotes; "everything is art and everyone is an artist. The question being, therefore, ‘what is it the art of? Capitalism". In 2017 Wells joined a Civil Union Co-op with Laura Wells and is currently based in Te Waipounamu.

View artwork
The Social
Christchurch

The Social is a community of artists who formed in Ōtautahi Christchurch in 2012, responding to the need for critical public dialogue and the lack of arts infrastructure at the time. Artist administrators Gaby Montejo, Lucy Matthews and Audrey Baldwin facilitate a much broader, non-hierarchical collective, which shifts and changes to fit opportunities as they present; the collective includes anywhere between three - forty artists, depending on who you ask.

View artwork
Tony Scanlan
Christchurch

Tony has been drawing and painting for a number of years, He studied print making as a mature student at Canterbury University and has recently completed a degree in Psychology.

View artwork
Kairos and the arrow of Being, Adrienne Millwood
More about this artwork

This project will follow on from the meditation session - "Mind the Art", held on Saturday 29th July.



How does the use of a camera connect with and extend the space of meditation and presence? 


Participants from the meditation session will have the option to participate in a photography session using disposable cameras. 


All photographs will be printed soon after and displayed within MAKING SPACE.

Democratic Ensamble Workshops and Performance, Julia Harvie
More about this artwork

Democratic Ensemble Workshops & Performance.


10 - 3pm, 8th and 9th July


 


Julia’s practice is inherently collaborative, she is often drawn to the question of what choreography is and who has permission to participate. Julia will facilitate a democratic ensemble workshop for MAKING SPACE. It will run for two days and have a performance outcome at the end. It would be a collaborative and democratic process that Julia will facilitate with her collaborator, Stuart Lloyd-Harris who will also photo document the work. The material created will be drawn from gathering pedestrian movement etchings while walking in the city inspired by Clara Wells Otautahi Automatic These etchings will then be structured and installed into the gallery and performed between 2-3pm on Sunday 9th July. They will related to ritual, exchange - a modern folk dance of sorts.


 


The ensemble material will then be collated and de/reconstructed by Julia for a performance with Jason Ware's Harmonix at 3pm on Saturday 15th July.


 


Both performances will be suitable to be viewed in entirety or as something to view for fleeting moments, given the gallery context.

The Social's inclusion in MAKING SPACE marks a moment in time where the collective is shifting as the city itself moves into a new phase of reconstruction. Original members have moved away, and new members have joined the conversations. There are less vacant lots, and the galleries have reopened, but many of the artists in The Social remain underrepresented, despite their prolific contributions to contemporary art discourse in the city. They have held space in the community contemporary art through a difficult period, operating often at their own cost.


The invitation to participate a gallery exhibition at this scale is in part an acknowledgement of their work during the years post quakes, and an effort to ensure they are not lost in the archiving of this tumultuous period. The offering of a production budget and fees - that didn’t require application forms - and guaranteed exhibition space -  without negotiating lease contracts - offers some freedoms, but as with all institutions, they are conditional. The Social’s usual methodology of working has been challenged and is challenging CoCA; both are adapting and expanding to meet or deny the other’s demands.

 

Toyota Sprinter Twin Cam, do you Logistics? (a collaborative project between Toyota and General Motors), Cushla Donaldson
More about this artwork

 


The artist bought a car upon arriving in Christchurch last week. She chose a Toyota Sprinter 1991, a sportier, high-end version of the famed Toyota Corolla. These car were notable for being the prototypes for a collaborative project between Toyota and General Motors between 1984-2002.


It's a great little car. Very reliable. The bodywork is what you would expect of a car this age, but the inside is tidy and has a Pioneer stereo.


Donaldson will be at The Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu and available to show you the car. Test drives possible for serious enquires.


Donaldson will also be making coffee and having a casual chat to potential buyers about Logistics and how they function in contemporary markets.


Please also feel free to PM or post any enquiries or questions on this page. All messages will be answered.


“A real knowledge of supply and movement factors must be the basis of every leader’s plan; only then can he know how and when to take risks with those factors, and battles are won by taking risks.”


—Napoleon 

Artist Studio, 2017, The Social
More about this artwork

The studio space will reflect the democratic, open and process-based ethos of The Social in playful, resourceful and simple ways. It is a space where people are welcome to sit and explore the behind-the-scenes workings of The Social. Hanging up in this space will be a calendar which will be updated weekly with the different projects facilitated by The Social. 

Scrap Princess, Trashimals, 2017Image credit: Janneth Gil  

Scrap Princess, Trashimals, 2017

Image credit: Janneth Gil

 

Gallery in a Gallery, 2017, The Social
More about this artwork

The Gallery in a Gallery is a space where artists working with The Social will be able to exhibit, hold events as well as performances throughout the duration of MAKING SPACE. 

It is situated at the back of the Mair gallery and in behind The Social's Artist Studio. 

DISPLAY, Ivan Lupi
More about this artwork

‘DISPLAY’ is a real-time research piece that allows me to discover and learn from local sources and eventually share the results with a broader audience both in the gallery and online.


In ‘DISPLAY’ I stand in the space in CoCA, during opening hours, every day for as long as I can for a week. My feet are bare. In my hands I display items which were used by performers who I believe were relevant in history and in my development. I don’t talk. From time to time I change the item. One of the items belongs to a New Zealand performance artist who will be discovered during the residency with the help of the public, other artists or whoever feels they want to bring something to the piece.


 


Caravan Residency


Ivan will also be holding the caravan residency from the 31st July - 6 August, 2017.

After Matisse, Draped Nude, Julia Holden
More about this artwork

Tiny Mural 

Caravan Residency, 2017, The Social
More about this artwork

The Caravan Residency is a project which began in 2013 where the deconstruction of the city following the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes resulted in a lack of spaces within the CBD for artists to operate out of. The Social offered artists from out of town a unique opportunity to be part of the transitional period. They secured permission to park a caravan on vacant sites in the central city and selected practitioners from around Aotearoa and abroad to come and stay for a week on site, providing free accommodation for the artists.


As part of MAKING SPACE, The Social are reinvigorating this project. Caravan will be situated in the forecourt of Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu. 

The Caravan Residency will be running alongside Martin Schick’s Nomad (thinking) Residency as he runs a parallel programme in a camping ground Switzerland with communication and exchanges between artists taking part in this international residency.


 

Drawing Machine, 2017, Mirabel Oliver, Gemma Stratton
More about this artwork

Hot Bottle lunch with the Department of Art Relations and Therapy, 2017, Lucy Matthews
More about this artwork

Hot Bottle lunch with the Department of Art Relations and Therapy


The Department of Art Relations and Therapy cares about your experience in the gallery. We aim to ease our clients transition into the gallery space, supporting a relaxed relationship with art practice and works. Research tells us that being physically warm can enhance our capacity for altered perception and generous receptivity, ease anxiety and excessive judging and stimulate a desire to 'let it all hang out'. Using the latest hot bottle research and technology the department offers a nostalgia infused heated core with white cube inspired covers to suit a variety of gallery patrons. During lunch periods the hot bottles will be filled by a specially trained technician to achieve the perfect heat to client ratio.


The Department of ART takes no responsibility for acts of relaxation, friendliness, drooling and nostalgia while engaged in our programme. We ask that the hot bottles come back clean and dry for the next client.


 


Mind the art with the Department of Art Relations and Therapy


A zen meditation teacher will teach a 20 minute meditation class in the gallery starting at 12 pm. Participants will then be invited to wander around the gallery or engage in collaborative work with Adrienne Milwood.

Caravan Residency, Callum Devlin
More about this artwork

Callum will hold the caravan residency from 11th- 16th June, 2017.

Free Advertising, Carrot Boy
More about this artwork

TinyMURL.project

Trashimals, 2017, Scrap Princess
More about this artwork

Scrap Princess will make animals out of trash in currently disused sites, trying to incorporate materials which have been dumped on the site as much as possible. They will be large and free-standing or, when location permits, rascally climbing on things. Soil and plants will also be incorporated where possible to make decay, change and growth part of their life.

Ōtautahi Automatic, 2017, Clara Wells
More about this artwork

Ōtautahi Automatic is the second work in what I hope to be a collection of animations which document the textures and motion of street sidewalks. Though often considered to be banal and static I have come to find pavements hide detailed textures which animate remarkably. Using the surrealist automatic drawing technique of frottage, a.k.a. taking rubbings, you can find all sorts of interesting movements and lots of surprises!



For this work I am asking volunteers to join me in creating rubbings around the streets of our beautiful, broken and re-growing city. On July 1 & 2 volunteers will join me in creating documentation of a stretch of central city footpath. I will take these rubbings and animate them in The Social’s open working studio at Toi Moroki. Anyone is welcome to come visit to see the process and chat. As soon as the work is complete it will be on display in CoCA for all to view, on or before July 9.


 

Political Sniff, 2017, Mark Harvey
More about this artwork

Artist Residency for NOMAD (THINKING) RESIDENCY



“Heal the world
Make it a better place
For you and for me
And the entire human race…”


(Michael Jackson, 1991)



Feeling like you want to have a say but never get to say it?


Do you like to send things in other ways?


Can’t stand politicians?


Want to be part of something bigger than a caravan?


Do you like the colour pink or yellow?


 



Politics for many of us is like a love hate relationship with the grumpy old cat who everyday sits for hours at the end of your street. You don’t know when he’s going to do let you pat him or when he’ll give you a swipe. What might happen if we try to spend time with this cat and explore notions of democracy and political opinion, not only locally but with the other side of the world, physically and telepathically? In this residency titled Political Bits Mark Harvey will engage with a range of strategies towards inviting and generating political proclamations and manifestos by members of the public and other artists in addition to himself, in the here and now and somewhere else. Through the flesh, video and extracurricular mind transference, the project will promise notions of collective democracy and be live and in Christchurch and simultaneously in a camping ground in Switzerland. Political Bits will connect with other artist projects in the exhibition in addition to The Physics Room and Circuit (Artist’s Film and Video Aotearoa) and it will simultaneously be part of the Festival Belluard Bollwerk International (http://belluard.ch/).

The Woven Bond, Robert Baker, Dee Chisholm, Tony Scanlan, Carrot Boy, Erena Moses
More about this artwork

We are a group of artists in Christchurch who, as individuals, all care about different things, whether it is racism, sexism, the environment, or economic inequality. Like fibres in woven cloth, we gain strength by supporting each other. We are designing and printing/painting/creating items of clothing for an anti-fashion show to be held in August. It is anti-fashion in the sense there won't be avant-garde haute-coutere designer clothing modelled by razor-thin pubescent models. Instead there will be recycled clothing, teeshirst and possibly old bald men among the 'models'.



Initially we are collecting ideas and sketches for a large book which will be on public display. People can come in off the street during this time to add to the book if the want. Any and all individuals, regardless of age, sex, or appearance are also welcome to model the clothing in the event. the more diverse the models the better.


 

It's Only Natural (Living Room), Rubee Prattley-Jones, Matt Joils, Olivia Isabel-Smith
More about this artwork

The natural world. A sense of place. The here and now. The everyday. What are some signposts of living in Christchurch in 2017? The ephemeral and unsung elements that often go unnoticed hold a kind of truth. Cloud patterns and water movements. Discarded rubbish accumulated in a gutter. Weeds in cracks in concrete. Our exhibition would be comprised of new works in various media exploring Christchurch, focussing on the city centre and the space around CoCA specifically. We propose to record and respond to natural and man-made elements. We are interested in human physicality and space, organic form and movement. We are open ended in our investigation. Perhaps we will dance a painting or sculpt a film. Let's see where this goes together!

Hari Poi, Mandy Joass
More about this artwork

Mandy's work encourages an atmosphere of inclusion and play by interacting with CoCA gallery visitors to create a multitude of colourful poi for a growing installation. Using found recycled and donated materials. Mandy will assist people from all walks of life to make poi for themselves, for the installation and show them how to use them. The installation would grow and be heard through the gallery. A sound and visual element could also be part of it. The traditional white of the Poi would be replaced with a multitude of colours to emulate inclusion of all cultures and individualism.

Harmonix, Jason Ware
More about this artwork

Tu'u Mai Lou Lima (Give Me Your Hands), 2017, Leafa Wilson
More about this artwork

Tu'u Mai Lou Lima (Give Me Your Hands)


Everyone needs touch. This performance is an offering, a very small gesture of giving healing and receiving it through the sense of touch. I will hold and caress your hands and give you a particle of my life source.

This performace will take place on Sunday 23 July from 11am - 4pm in The Social's caravan located outside the Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu.

Caravan Residency, Numangatini Mackenzie
More about this artwork

Numangatini will hold the caravan residency from the 5th- 10th June, 2017.

Caravan Residency, Jordana Bragg
More about this artwork

Jordana will be holding the caravan residency from the 23rd- 29th July, 2017.


They will also be exhibiting a tiny murl for a week during MAKING SPACE.

Tiny murl, Jordana Bragg
More about this artwork

The Collective Remix, Mark Catley
More about this artwork

Mark's tiny murl work will re-mix the previous 9 tiny murl artworks into a completely new abstract piece. Through this process he will create his own art work and give the previous 9 artists another chance to have their work up on the mural.

Tiny Murl, 2017, Aleshia Edens
More about this artwork

Tiny murl, Sandrine Castel
More about this artwork

Tiny Murl, Liv Worsnop
More about this artwork

Tiny murl, Alex Wootton
More about this artwork

Tiny murl, Andy Lukey
More about this artwork

Tiny murl, Brie Sherow
More about this artwork

Note To Poor, Tao Wells
More about this artwork

Tiny murl project

Tiny murl, Julia Holden
More about this artwork

Tiny murl, Matt Ward
More about this artwork

TinyMURL.project, 2017, The Social
More about this artwork

The TinyMURL.project was originally a guerilla project where frames were installed on abandoned buildings around the CBD and artists submitted posters for display in them. At CoCA, a series of posters submitted by artists will sit in the galleries existing poster frame for a week at a time outside cafe Lux Expresso.